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The intertestamental period, also called the second temple period, is the time between the writing of the last Old Testament book and the beginning of the events described in the New Testament.

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Introduction

Scope

The intertestamental period, also called the second temple period, is the time between the writing of the last Old Testament book and the beginning of the events described in the New Testament. This period saw the translation of the Septuagint, the establishment of the Roman Empire, and the continued spread of Hellenistic culture, and developments within Judaism such as the writing of a large body of Apocryphal and pseudepigraphal works and the development of the Pharisee, Sadducee, and Essene sects. New Testament scholars study the period primarily to learn about the culture in which the New Testament was written and to understand the influences on early Christianity from Judaism and Hellenistic or Roman religions.

Because this topic is so broad, only the most basic sources have been included in the research guide. Included are works on archeology, the Apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, early Judaism, Greco-Roman religion, and New Testament history. Further works can be found by consulting the library catalog under the suggested headings or by browsing the suggested call numbers.

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This LibGuide by Duncan Johnson and Lincoln Mullen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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